Scheherazade Goes West: Different Cultures, Different Harems

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Washington Square Press #ad - So recalls fatema Mernissi at the outset of her mesmerizing new book. Now, as a writer and scholarly veteran of the high-wire act of straddling disparate societies, she trains her eyes on the female culture of the West. When a woman decides to use her wings, she takes big risks, but she was convinced that if you didn't use them, " she would tell me, it hurt.

. Indeed, in journeys both physical and mental, Mernissi has spent virtually all of her life traveling -- determined to "use her wings" and to renounce her gender's alleged legacy of powerlessness. Interwoven with vivid ruminations on her childhood, and her various international travels are the author's piquant musings on a range of deeply embedded societal conditions that add up, her education, Mernissi argues, to a veritable "Western harem.

A provocative and lively challenge to the common assumption that women have it so much better in the West than anywhere else in the world, Mernissi's book is an entrancing and timely look at the way we live here and now. In her previous bestselling works, mernissi -- widely recognized as the world's greatest living Koranic scholar and Islamic sociologist -- has shed unprecedented light on the lives of women in the Middle East.

Throughout my childhood, who was illiterate and grew up in a harem, my grandmother Yasmina, repeated that to travel is the best way to learn and to empower yourself. Of all the lessons she learned from her grandmother -- whose home was, after all, a type of prison -- the most central was that the opportunity to cross boundaries was a sacred privilege.

Scheherazade Goes West: Different Cultures, Different Harems #ad - Her often surprising discoveries about the conditions of and attitudes toward women around the world -- and the exquisitely embroidered amalgam of clear-eyed autobiography and dazzling meta-fiction by which she relates those assorted discoveries -- add up to a deliciously wry, engagingly cosmopolitan, and deeply penetrating narrative.

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Dreams Of Trespass: Tales Of A Harem Girlhood

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Basic Books #ad - This "wonderful and enchanting" memoir tells the revelatory true story of one Muslim girl's life in her family's French Moroccan harem, set against the backdrop of World War II The New York Times Book Review. In dreams of trespass, mernissi weaves her own memories with the dreams and memories of the women who surrounded her in the courtyard of her youth -- women who, without access to the world outside, recreated it from sheer imagination.

I was born in a harem in 1940 in Fez, Morocco. So begins fatima mernissi in this illuminating narrative of a childhood behind the iron gates of a domestic harem. A beautifully written account of a girl confronting the mysteries of time and place, gender and sex, Dreams of Trespass illuminates what it was like to be a modern Muslim woman in a place steeped in tradition.

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The Way of Tenderness: Awakening through Race, Sexuality, and Gender

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Wisdom Publications #ad - Her hard-won insights reveal that dry wisdom alone is not sufficient to heal the wounds of the marginalized; an effective practice must embrace the tenderness found where conventional reality and emptiness intersect. What does liberation mean when i have incarnated in a particular body, color, zen priest Zenju Earthlyn Manuel brings Buddhist philosophies of emptiness and appearance to bear on race, with a particular shape, and gender, and sex?”In The Way of Tenderness, sexuality, using wisdom forged through personal experience and practice to rethink problems of identity and privilege.

. Only warmth and compassion can cure hatred and heal the damage it wreaks within us. This is a book that will teach us all. Manuel brings her own experiences as a bisexual black woman into conversation with Buddhism to square our ultimately empty nature with superficial perspectives of everyday life.

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Baghdad Burning: Girl Blog from Iraq

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The Feminist Press at CUNY #ad - In 2003, a twenty-four-year-old woman from Baghdad began blogging about life in the city under the pseudonym Riverbend. Her passion, honesty, and wry idiomatic English made her work a vital contribution to our understanding of post-war Iraq—and won her a large following. Riverbend is bright and opinionated, but like all voices of dissent worth remembering, true, whichever governments we struggle under, she provides an urgent reminder that, we are all the same.

Booklist   “feisty and learned: first-rate reading for any American who suspects that Fox News may not be telling the whole story. Kirkus. She describes rolling blackouts, daily explosions, intermittent water access, gas shortages and travel restrictions. Baghdad burning is a quotidian chronicle of Riverbend’s life with her family between April 2003 and September of 2004.

Baghdad Burning: Girl Blog from Iraq #ad - Since the fall of bagdad, but four months after Saddam Hussein’s statue fell, women’s voices have been largely erased, a 24 year-old woman from Baghdad began blogging. Her book “offers quick takes on events as they occur, from a perspective too often overlooked, ignored or suppressed” Publishers Weekly.

She also expresses a strong stance against the interim government, the Bush administration, and Islamic fundamentalists like Al Sadr and his followers.

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The Namesake: A Novel

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Mariner Books #ad - With penetrating insight, sometimes painfully, she reveals not only the defining power of the names and expectations bestowed upon us by our parents, but also the means by which we slowly, come to define ourselves. When their son is born, the task of naming him betrays the vexed results of bringing old ways to the new world.

Here again lahiri displays her deft touch for the perfect detail -- the fleeting moment, the turn of phrase -- that opens whole worlds of emotion. An engineer by training, ashoke adapts far less warily than his wife, who resists all things American and pines for her family. In the namesake, the conflicts of assimilation, Lahiri enriches the themes that made her collection an international bestseller: the immigrant experience, most poignantly, the clash of cultures, and, the tangled ties between generations.

The Namesake: A Novel #ad - Among the many other awards and honors it received were the New Yorker Debut of the Year award, acuity, the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the highest critical praise for its grace, and compassion in detailing lives transported from India to America. Her stories are one of the very few debut works -- and only a handful of collections -- to have won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

Named for a russian writer by his indian parents in memory of a catastrophe years before, Gogol Ganguli knows only that he suffers the burden of his heritage as well as his odd, antic name. On the heels of their arranged wedding, Ashoke and Ashima Ganguli settle together in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Lahiri brings great empathy to Gogol as he stumbles along the first-generation path, comic detours, strewn with conflicting loyalties, and wrenching love affairs.

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The Arabian Nights AmazonClassics Edition

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AmazonClassics #ad - Through fanciful histories, poems, riddles, romances, tragedies, comedies, and songs, Scheherazade prolongs her life by holding the king’s rapt attention. With origins in persian and eastern indian folklore, the stories of The Arabian Nights have been reworked, collected, revised, reshaped, and supplemented throughout the centuries by various authors and scholars—and are continually redefined by the modern translations of the Western world.

Amazonclassics brings you timeless works from the masters of storytelling. Her plan? Bleed one tale into another. Ideal for anyone who wants to read a great work for the first time or rediscover an old favorite, these new editions open the door to literature’s most unforgettable characters and beloved worlds.

The Arabian Nights AmazonClassics Edition #ad - Revised edition: previously published as The Arabian Nights, this edition of The Arabian Nights AmazonClassics Edition includes editorial revisions. The vengeful king schahriar agrees to stave off the execution of Queen Scheherazade until she finishes a particularly compelling story.

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The Home That Was Our Country: A Memoir of Syria

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Bold Type Books #ad - Teeming with insights, the narrative weaves acute political analysis with a century of intimate family history, delivering an unforgettable portrait of the Syria that is being erased. Its loss was central to her parent's decision to make their lives in America. In chronicling the people who lived in the tahaan building, past and present, Jews, Christians, and suffered in close quarters, and Kurds--who worked, Armenians, Alia portrays the Syrians--the Muslims, loved, mirroring the political shifts in their country.

Restoring her family's home as the country comes apart, she learns how to speak the coded language of oppression that exists in a dictatorship, while privately confronting her own fears about Syria's future. The home that was our country is a deeply researched, personal journey that shines a delicate but piercing light on Syrian history, society, and politics.

The Home That Was Our Country: A Memoir of Syria #ad - Alia malek weaves a lyrical narrative around the history of her family's apartment building in the heart of Damascus, the many lives that crossed in the stairwell, and how the fates of her neighbors reflect the fate of her country. At the arab spring's hopeful start, alia malek returned to Damascus to reclaim her grandmother's apartment, which had been lost to her family since Hafez al-Assad came to power in 1970

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Secret Son

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Algonquin Books #ad - A wealthy businessman, he seems eager to give his son a new start. Trapped once again by his class and painfully aware of the limitations of his prospects, he becomes easy prey for a fringe Islamic group. In the spirit of the inheritance of loss and the reluctant fundamentalist, Laila Lalami’s debut novel looks at the struggle for identity, politics, the need for love and family, and the desperation that grips ordinary lives in a world divided by class, and religion.

Suddenly his dreams are within reach when he discovers that his father—whom he’d been led to believe was dead—is very much alive. Youssef leaves his mother behind to live a life of luxury, until a reversal of fortune sends him back to the streets and his childhood friends. Raised by his mother in a one-room house in the slums of Casablanca, Youssef El Mekki has always had big dreams of living another life in another world.

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The Barbary Plague: The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco

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Random House #ad - But the harbor would not be safe for long. Uphill they scurried, insinuating themselves into the heart of the city. The plague first sailed into san Francisco on the steamer Australia, on the day after New Year’s in 1900 An intellectually astute but autocratic scientist, Kinyoun lacked the diplomatic skill to manage the public health crisis successfully.

The rats slipped out of their shadowy holds, scuttled down the rigging, and alighted on the wharf. When a second epidemic erupted five years later, the more self-possessed and charming Dr. Blue preached sanitation to contain the disease, if little known, but it was only when he focused his attack on the newly discovered source of the plague, that he finally eradicated it—truly one of the great, infected rats and their fleas, triumphs in American public health history.

With stunning narrative immediacy fortified by rich research, marilyn Chase transports us to the city during the late Victorian age—a roiling melting pot of races and cultures that, nearly destroyed by an earthquake, was reborn, thanks in no small part to Rupert Blue and his motley band of pied pipers.

The Barbary Plague: The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco #ad - Initially in charge of the government’s response was Quarantine Officer Dr. Rupert Blue was placed in command. He won the trust of san franciscans by shifting the government’s attack on the plague from the cool remove of the laboratory onto the streets, among the people it affected. It had a pompous new skyline with skyscrapers nearly twenty stories tall, grand hotels, and Victorian mansions on Nob Hill.

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The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity The Norton History of Science

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Alive and fascinating and provocative on every page. Oliver Sacks, M. D. Hailed as "a remarkable achievement" Boston Sunday Globe and as "a triumph: simultaneously entertaining and instructive, witty and thought-provoking. Porter explores medicine's evolution against the backdrop of the wider religious, scientific, and political beliefs of the culture in which it develops, philosophical, covering ground from the diseases of the hunter-gatherers to today's threat of AIDS and ebola, from the clearly defined conviction of the Hippocratic oath to the muddy ethical dilemmas of modern-day medicine.

. The author's perceptiveness is, as usual, scalpel-sharp; his manner genially bedside; his erudition invigorating. Simon Schama. Offering up a treasure trove of historical surprises along the way, this book "has instantly become the standard single-volume work in its field" The Lancet. A splendid and thoroughly engrossing book" los Angeles Times, Roy Porter's charting of the history of medicine affords us an opportunity as never before to assess its culture and science and its costs and benefits to mankind.

The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity The Norton History of Science #ad - To combine enormous knowledge with a delightful style and a highly idiosyncratic point of view is Roy Porter's special gift, and it makes this book.

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Do Muslim Women Need Saving?

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Harvard University Press #ad - It offers a detailed, moving portrait of the actual experiences of ordinary Muslim women, and of the contingencies with which they live. Do muslim women need saving? is an indictment of a mindset that has justified all manner of foreign interference, including military invasion, in the name of rescuing women from Islam.

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