English Conditional Sentences: Past, Present, Future; Real, Unreal Conditionals English Daily Use Book 7

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Manik Joshi #ad - Note: use of imperative SentenceIf you are working for something with convictions, you are satisfied. If proper punishment is not awarded to the accused, the faith of the society is shaken in the legal system of the country. There are two clauses in conditional sentences:dependent clause: expresses the conditionmain clause: expresses the consequencethis book covers the following topics: what are "conditional sentences"?present Real Conditional SentencesPresent Unreal Conditional SentencesPast Real Conditional SentencesPast Unreal Conditional SentencesFuture Real Conditional SentencesFuture Unreal Conditional SentencesContinuous Forms of Conditional SentencesMixed Conditional Sentences'Were To' - Conditional Sentences'Special Force' - Conditional Sentences'Wish'- Conditional Sentences'Miscellaneous' - Conditional SentencesConditional Sentences: Exercise - 1Conditional Sentences: Exercise - 2SummarySample This:Present Real Conditional SentencesThe Present Real Conditional Is Used To Talk About What You Normally Do In Real-Life Situations.

English Conditional Sentences: Past, Present, Future; Real, Unreal Conditionals English Daily Use Book 7 #ad - Structurefirst part - if / when + Subject + Present Verb. Second part - simple presentorfirst part - simple Present, Second Part - If / When + Subject + Present Verb. Whether use "if" or "when"?"If" implies - things don't happen regularly. When" implies - things happen regularly.

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Making Comparisons in English: Similarities, Dissimilarities, Degrees English Daily Use Book 10

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Manik Joshi #ad - Interchange of Comparative and Superlative Degrees10e. Interchange of Positive and Comparative Degrees10c. Had better/had rather/had sooner/would rather/Would Sooner + Ordinary Verb + Than + Ordinary VerbExample 1:I prefer studying to playing. I would prefer studying to playing. I prefer to study rather than play.

I would prefer to study rather than play. I had better study than play. I had rather study than play. I had sooner study than play. I would rather study than play. I would sooner study than play. Example 2:You prefer writing to talking. You would prefer writing to talking. You prefer to write rather than talk. You would prefer to write rather than talk.

Making Comparisons in English: Similarities, Dissimilarities, Degrees English Daily Use Book 10 #ad - You had better write than talk. You had rather write than talk. You had sooner write than talk. You would rather write than talk. You would sooner write than talk.

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Ending Sentences with Prepositions: Useful Tips English Daily Use Book 23

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Manik Joshi #ad - Using a preposition at the end of a sentence is not grammatically incorrect. The word preposition expresses "position before" so it is improper to place a preposition at the end! This is, however, not a rule. You can end your sentences with prepositions. But as most people avoid 'excessive' use of prepositions at the end of sentences, you can follow suit, and may use them only when they give strength to your language.

Some words on, off, over, etc. May be used as both prepositions and adverbs. So, whenever they see these words at the end of sentences, they think that they are prepositions. However, everyone can't easily differentiate between preposition and adverb. As most of the people are averse to the idea of using prepositions at the end of sentences, they even don't use these words as adverbs at the end of sentences.

Actually, it is a myth that you shouldn't use preposition at the end of a sentence. This book covers the following topics: a big mythlist of prepositionsending a sentence with a preposition - about, of, upon, by, out, on, in, at, from, against, into, for, to, with - example sentenceswhen to end a sentence with a prepositionsituation - 01 - Interrogative SentencesSituation - 02 - Passive Voice SentencesSituation - 03 - Infinitive StructuresSituation - 04 - Relative ClausesSituation - 05 - Phrasal VerbsHow to Avoid Ending a Sentence with a PrepositionOption - 01 - Restructuring the SentenceOption - 02 - Using a Different WordAvoid Unnecessary Use of PrepositionsAdditional ExamplesExercises: 1A and 1BExercises: 2A and 2BSample This:A Big MythIt is said we should avoid ending a sentence with a preposition.

Ending Sentences with Prepositions: Useful Tips English Daily Use Book 23 #ad - Sometimes, using preposition at the end of a sentence seems better than using it in the middle or beginning of a sentence. Ending a sentence with a preposition - aboutan ad agency's job is to take a brand to consumers and communicate the proposition well to them, so that they understand what the brand is all about.

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How to Start a Sentence: Words to Begin Sentences English Daily Use Book 1

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Manik Joshi #ad - But there are many other words which are widely used to start asentence. Use these words in the beginning of a sentence onlywhen they really give strength to your language. Note: it is said that a sentence should not be begun with a conjunction of any kind, or, nor, and, yet, but, especially one of the FANBOYS for, so.

This book covers the following topics: how to start a sentencestart a sentence -- using 'as'start a sentence -- using 'after' and 'before'start a sentence -- using 'by'start a sentence -- using 'for/fromstart a sentence -- using 'if'start a sentence -- using 'of/on/out'start a sentence -- using 'to'start a sentence -- using 'in'start a Sentence -- Using 'WITH'Start a Sentence -- Using 'QUESTION WORDS'Start a Sentence -- Using 'ING' FORM of VERBSStart a Sentence -- Using 'PAST PARTICIPLES'Start a Sentence -- Using '-LY Words'Start a Sentence -- Using 'PRONOUNS'Start a Sentence - MiscellaneousExercises: 1A and 1BExercises: 2A and 2BSample This:There are different ways to start a sentence in English.

How to Start a Sentence: Words to Begin Sentences English Daily Use Book 1 #ad - Particularly in spoken English, starting a sentence with 'And' or 'But' is common. How to start a sentence -- Using 'AS'As a matter of fact no notice was given to anyone. As a policeman myself, I am aware of all the laws. As against last time four days, the fair will last for five days this year. As always, he won the match.

As an interim arrangement, we directed the authorities not to return the land. As fate would have it, he crossed the international border.

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Creating Long Sentences in English: Boost Your Communication Skills English Daily Use Book 8

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Manik Joshi #ad - This book covers the following topics:patterns for creating long sentences01 -- using '-ing form of verbs' i02 -- using '-ing form of verbs' ii03 -- using '-ing form of verbs' iii04 -- using 'with + -ing form of verbs'05 -- using 'series'06 -- Using 'From - To'07 -- Using 'Connecting Words or Phrases'08 -- Using 'Parenthesis'09 -- Miscellaneous PatternsSample This:01 -- Using '-ING Form of Verbs' IExample 01:The ongoing drought in the state is being described as the country's worst in many decades, causing agricultural distress and forcing villagers to move to urban areas looking for work.

Main verb - described-ing form of verbs - causing, forcingExplanation:The ongoing drought in the state is being described as the country's worst in many decades. Drought is causing agricultural distress. Drought is also forcing villagers to move to urban areas looking for work. Example 02:offering huge relief to ten thousand families belonging to the below poverty line category in the state, minister directed Power Corporation Limited to waive pending domestic power bills for last 10 months.

Creating Long Sentences in English: Boost Your Communication Skills English Daily Use Book 8 #ad - Main verb - directed-ing form of verbs - offering, belongingExplanation:Minister directed Power Corporation Limited to waive pending domestic power bills for last 10 months. Minister offered huge relief to ten thousand families. Families belonged to the below poverty line category in the state. Example 03:a deadly winter storm blanketed a huge swath of the US, grounding flights, turning highways into the ice rinks and knocking out power to tens of thousands preparing for the New Year holiday.

Main verb - blanketed-ing form of verbs - grounding, knocking, turning, preparingExplanation:A deadly winter storm blanketed a huge swath of the US.

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Direct and Indirect Speech: English Speaking English Daily Use Book 21

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Manik Joshi #ad - Exclamations' in Direct and Indirect Speech10 This book covers The Following Topics:01. On this basis, sentences are of two types: sentences with Direct Speech, and sentences with Indirect SpeechDIRECT SPEECHDirect Speech is also called Quoted Speech or Direct Narration. Direct speech refers exactly what someone has said.

Direct and Indirect Speech: English Speaking English Daily Use Book 21 #ad - Direct speech appears within quotation marks ". ". Direct and indirect Speech: Mixed Types12. Pronoun Change05. Changing Modal Verbs08. Expression of timeyou need to change expression of time when changing direct speech DS into indirect speech IDS to match the moment of speaking. Important Reporting Verbs04. Reporting Verb with Object07.

Punctuation Rules14. Direct and Indirect Speech02. Where to put reporting Verb in Direct Speech13. Expression of Time03. Questions' in Direct and Indirect Speech09. Imperatives' in Direct and Indirect Speech11.

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Interchange of Active and Passive Voice: Patterns and Examples English Daily Use Book 12

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Manik Joshi #ad - Verb followed by --ING form or an Infinitive17. Verb + Preposition7. When active subject is obvious. 4. You should use passive voice when you do not know the active subject. 2. The passive With Get19. You can also use passive voice when you want to avoid extra-long subjects. Changing active voice into passive VoiceRule 1:Move the object of the active voice into the position of subject front of the sentence in the passive voice.

You can use passive voice to avoid responsibility. 10 There + verb 'be' + Noun + Infinitive13. Past modals + Past Participle6. When you want to make more polite or formal statements. 9. Future Continuous Tense4. And move the subject of the active voice into the position of object in the passive voice. Rule 2:passive voice needs a helping verb to express the action.

Interchange of Active and Passive Voice: Patterns and Examples English Daily Use Book 12 #ad - When you want to make the active object more important. 3. Present Perfect Continuous Tense2. You can also use passive voice for sentence variety in your writing.

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English Modal Auxiliary Verbs: May, Might, Can, Could, Will, Would, Shall, Should, Must, Need English Daily Use Book 20

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Manik Joshi #ad - Modal auxiliary verb or 'modal verb' or 'modalauxiliary' is a verb that is used with another verb not a modal verbto express ability, probability, obligation, necessity, intention, possibility, permission, etc. English modal auxiliary verbs -may, suggestion, should, recommendation, suggestion, condition |will, probability in present and future | can, surprise, probability, should are used to express- action infuture, dare | different patterns and examples | may andmight are used to express- possibility, can, need, obligation, request, importance or purpose | need is used toexpress necessity | usedto is used to express- past habit | oughttois used to express- probability, could are used to express-ability, could, present habit, oughtto, compulsion, obligation | shall, might, must, compulsion, possibility, will, would are used to express- action in future, obligation, would, usedto, shall, advise |dare is used to express- be brave enough toSample This:Modal Auxiliary Verb -- May and Might'May' and 'Might' are used to show Possibility and Probability'May' and 'Might' are used to ask for Permission'May' is used to give or refuse PermissionSome Important Uses of 'May' and 'Might'To say what the purpose of something isWe eat that we may live.

Her prayer was that the child might live. That he might be well fed his mother starved herself. To admit that something is true before introducing another point, argument, etc. You may not return to past glory, but don't stop believing. City may not have the roads to drive sports car, but it has excellent infrastructure.

English Modal Auxiliary Verbs: May, Might, Can, Could, Will, Would, Shall, Should, Must, Need English Daily Use Book 20 #ad - It may not be wise, but using force may be lawful.

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English Interrogative Sentences: Common Interrogative Patterns English Daily Use Book 2

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Manik Joshi #ad - Why + be/do/have/Modal1I. How + be/do/have/modalstructure 2 -- wh-question Word + Word/Words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2A. Which + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2E. Interrogatives starting From - Have, Has, Had4D. Who + be/do/have/Modal1F. Where + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2D. What + be/do/Have/Modal1B. All these words except 'how' even start from 'Wh'.

Note: the following words are also used to ask questions:Whatever, Whenever, WhoeverThese forms show 'surprise, Wherever, confusion, or emphasis. Besides 'wh-question words', auxiliary verbs 'Be', 'Do', 'Have', and 'Modal Verbs' are also used to form interrogative sentences. Which + be/do/Have/Modal1E. Why + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2I.

English Interrogative Sentences: Common Interrogative Patterns English Daily Use Book 2 #ad - Whom + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2G. An interrogative sentence usually changes the word order so that the verb or part of the verb comes before the subject. When + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2C. Whom + be/do/Have/Modal1G. Whose + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2H. What + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2B. Who + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2F.

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Using Tenses in English: Past, Present, Future English Daily Use Book 15

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Manik Joshi #ad - I/we/you/they do not talk. Most buses do not cater to interior parts of the villages. He does not know what to say. I/we/you/They talk. We seek opportunity to chart out our own course. Lean margin of victory or defeat gives an impression of a tough contest. Nowadays, voters value development over other issues. They want civic amenities and employment opportunities.

B. Negative pattern -subject + auxiliary verb 'do/does' + not + first form of main verb + other wordsAuxiliary Verb 'Does' is used with subject 'He and She' + All Singular Subjects. Auxiliary verb 'do' is used with subject 'I, We, You and They' + All Plural Subjects. Examples:He/She does not talk. Affirmative pattern -subject + first form of main verb + other wordsSingular Verb is used with subject 'He and She' + All Singular Subjects.

Plural verb is used with subject 'I, We, You and They' + All Plural Subjects. Examples:He/She talks. This book covers the following topics: what are "tenses"?agreement between subject and verbtwenty-four auxiliary verbsregular and irregular verbspresent tensepresent indefinite tensepresent continuous/progressive tensepresent perfect tensepresent Perfect Continuous/Progressive TensePAST TENSEPast Indefinite TensePast Continuous/Progressive TensePast Perfect TensePast Perfect Continuous/Progressive TenseFUTURE TENSEFuture Indefinite TenseFuture Continuous/Progressive TenseFuture Perfect TenseFuture Perfect Continuous/Progressive TenseUseful NotesExercisesSample This:Tenses could be defined as "any of the form of a verb that may be used to show the time of the action or an event or state expressed by the verb".

Using Tenses in English: Past, Present, Future English Daily Use Book 15 #ad - There are three kinds of tenses:the past tense - the form of a verb that usually expresses an action that happened in the pastaction happened before presentthe present tense - the form of a verb that usually expresses an action that happens at this timeaction happens in presentthe future tense - the form of a verb that usually expresses an action that will happen in futureAction will happen after presentEACH OF THESE THREE KINDS OF SENTENCES HAS FOUR TYPES OF FORMS:Indefinite or Simple FormContinuous or Progressive FormPerfect FormPerfect Continuous or Perfect Progressive FormEACH OF THESE FOUR TYPES OF FORMS HAS FOUR KINDS OF STATEMENTS:Affirmative Statement --Used to Show 'Agreement'Negative Statement --Used to Show 'Disagreement'Interrogative Statement --Used to Ask 'Question'Interrogative-Negative Statement --Used to Ask 'Question' and Show 'Disagreement'Present Indefinite TenseExpresses -Permanent situation in the past, present and futureExample: Our family lives in Seattle.

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Popular English Idioms and Phrases: English Idiomatic Expressions English Daily Use Book 28

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Manik Joshi #ad - An accidental fire in your home is not considered an act of God because it could have been prevented. Pole apart' -- completely oppositeAPPLE025. The next thing cannot be true, possible, etc. EitherapaRT021. Storm has torn apart the lives of thousands of people. The celebration started a day in advance. State governments should add more teeth to anti-ragging law.

Popular English Idioms and Phrases: English Idiomatic Expressions English Daily Use Book 28 #ad - When the residents started receiving mysterious threats, there was an air of mystery and fear. 012b. Tear apart' -- to destroy024. In advance' -- ahead of timeAFFAIR008. A saddle tank on the tractor-trailer came apart and caused a diesel spill. They could not figure out how to punish corrupt officials, let alone fix them.

We want our wedding to be a quiet affair. Agree010 From all accounts, he is a smart, fair-minded, detail-oriented middle-of-the road jurist. From all accounts' -- according to what other people sayACT006. Body is nothing but a pile of ashes and it will one day disappear into thin air. 014b.

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